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Mayor Bloomberg Seeks to Restrict Large Sodas

Mayor Bloomberg Seeks to Restrict Large Sodas

New York City looks to ban sodas bigger than 16 ounces from restaurants, movie theaters, and more

The fight against sodas rages on, with Mayor Bloomberg's proposal to ban the sale of 16-ounce and larger sugary drinks from sale in New York City.

And it's not just sodas getting the ax — The New York Times reports that the ban would extend to dairy drinks (like your iced coffee sugar-filled treats), diet sodas, and fruit juices. Drinks with fewer than 25 calories per eight ounces, i.e. Vitamin Water, would be OK under the new ruling.

The plan, which would affect sales at NYC bodegas, restaurants, movie theaters, and even sports arenas, is Bloomberg's most far-reaching plan to combat obesity. Already, Bloomberg has passed rulings against artificial trans fats in restaurants, and required restaurant health grades to be displayed.

The ruling must still be approved by the Board of Health in New York City, and is likely to pass. While responding to critics who call him "Mayor Nanny Bloomberg" for criticizing consumer choices, Bloomberg said he didn't think the new rule would limit consumers. (After all, there's no proposal against free refills.) He said in an interview to the NYT, "Your argument, I guess, could be that it’s a little less convenient to have to carry two 16-ounce drinks to your seat in the movie theater rather than one 32-ounce... I don’t think you can make the case that we’re taking things away."

Lobbyists from soda groups are against the ruling; said spokesman Stefan Friedman from the New York Beverage Association to The New York Times, "The New York City health department’s unhealthy obsession with attacking soft drinks is again pushing them over the top... These zealous proposals just distract from the hard work that needs to be done on this [obesity] front."


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

Must-read stories from the L.A. Times

Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.


Mayor Bloomberg faces new setback in NYC super-sized soda ban

Mayor Michael Bloomberg suffered another setback Tuesday in his quest to limit the size of sugary drinks being sold in New York when a court upheld an earlier judge’s invalidation of the law, but the city said it will keep fighting to enforce the rule.

“Today’s decision is a temporary setback, and we plan to appeal this decision as we continue the fight against the obesity epidemic,” Bloomberg said after a state appellate court unanimously ruled that his ban on sugary sodas of more than 16 ounces was a violation of executive powers.

That decision upheld one issued March 11, the day before the limits were to take effect. They would have made New York the nation’s first city to restrict sales of super-sized sugary drinks, which Bloomberg says contribute to an obesity epidemic killing more than 5,000 New Yorkers each year.

Sugary beverages are the key driver of the epidemic, he says.

The March decision by State Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling was a victory for a coalition of groups, including labor unions and the restaurant industry, which had sued to block enforcement after the city’s Board of Health easily approved the regulations last September.

Tingling said the measure was “laden with exceptions” that made its enforcement “arbitrary and capricious.” It would have affected only food service establishments regulated by the city’s Board of Health, such as restaurants, delis and concession stands at cinemas and stadiums, for example.

Grocery stores and corner markets, which are regulated by the state, would not have been affected, meaning a McDonald’s could not have sold a 32-ounce soda, but a 7-Eleven across the street could have sold a Big Gulp.

Tingling also said the Board of Health did not have the authority to pass such rules and that allowing it to do so would undermine limits on authority aimed at preventing abuse of power.

The appellate court on Tuesday agreed.

Bloomberg, who has made improving health a cornerstone of his mayoralty, has made clear he will not back down on the soda issue, one of many health initiatives he has introduced in his three terms in office.

In 2008, New York became the first major city to require large restaurant chains to include calorie counts on menus. Similar laws have since been adopted elsewhere in the country. It has also slashed the use of artificial trans fats in prepared foods and has banned smoking in most public areas.

In the last five years, the city has added 350 miles of bike lanes, to the chagrin of many motorists, and earlier this month, Bloomberg announced plans to introduce the country’s first legislation aimed at steering people away from elevators and escalators and toward staircases.

“We must be doing something right,” Bloomberg said when he introduced his stair-climbing plan, crediting his changes with giving New Yorkers a longer life expectancy than the national average.

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Tina Susman, an Oakland native, is a former New York-based national correspondent who joined the Los Angeles Times as Baghdad bureau chief in January 2007. She got her start as a foreign correspondent with the Associated Press in South Africa, covering the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela. Dubbed by past editors “the master of disaster,” she has also worked in west Africa and done stints in Europe, Asia and Haiti. She is thrilled to now be in a city with quirky features, non-stop news, and functioning phones and electricity. She left The Times in 2015.