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Simple Green Chile Tomato Salsa

Simple Green Chile Tomato Salsa

Quick and easy tomato and green chile salsa, with canned cooked tomatoes, green chiles, scallions, garlic, oil, vinegar, oregano, and cilantro.

Photography Credit:Elise Bauer

There are two basic types of tomato-based salsas — salsa made with fresh tomatoes and salsa made with cooked tomatoes. When cooking salsa, as we do when we make enchiladas, we always use the cooked-tomato version, not the fresh.

This particular salsa is popular in the north, or Sonoran part of Mexico, because of its use of Anaheim green chiles.

Starting at age seven it was my job to make salsa for our family, which I did at least once a week for ten years. This is the recipe we used, the only difference between now and the mid-60s is that now you can get some very good canned “fire-roasted” tomatoes, perfect for salsa making.

Salsa ingredients

This salsa uses almost all pantry ingredients. You’ll need canned tomatoes, green chiles, olive oil, red wine vinegar, oregano, garlic or garlic powder, salt, pepper, green onions, and cilantro.

Why used canned tomatoes?

If you live where we do, and in most places in the U.S., you can only get great fresh tomatoes maybe 2 months out of the year.

If you do have access to good tomatoes and want to make the effort to roast them yourself, go for it! Put several tomatoes under a broiler until the skin is blistered all over, remove from the oven, let cool, remove the skin. You can do the same with the Anaheim chiles.

Easy enough for a child to make

Yet, the beauty of this recipe is that it is something a 7-year old can make in about 10 minutes — pretty useful when you are trying to get dinner on the table.

And speaking of dinner, the way we usually serve our salsa? with steak and refried beans.

More great salsa recipes

Like salsa? Check out these other terrific salsa recipes:

  • Canned Tomato Salsa
  • Tomatillo salsa verde
  • Fresh tomato salsa fresca
  • Corn Salsa
  • Mango Salsa

Simple Green Chile Tomato Salsa Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 28-oz can whole tomatoes, preferably fire-roasted (Muir Glen makes an excellent product.)
  • 1 7-oz can green chiles, chopped*
  • 1 clove of garlic, or 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or garlic salt
  • 2 green onions (scallions), chopped, including the green parts (about 1/3 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano (can supplement with fresh)
  • 1/4 cup of very loosely packed fresh chopped cilantro
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

*Or one large 6 inch or two smaller Anaheim chiles, roasted under a broiler or directly on a gas stove burner so that the outer skin has completely blackened. Put into a brown paper bag for a few minutes after roasting to loosen the blackened skin. Remove and discard the blackened skin. Remove the stem, seeds, and ribs. Chop.

Method

1 Break up the canned tomatoes: Remove just the tomatoes from the can of whole tomatoes, place in a medium sized non-reactive mixing bowl. Using your fingers, or a fork and a sharp small knife, shred or break up the tomatoes.

2 Add the rest of the ingredients to the tomatoes: Mix in chopped green chiles, green onions, garlic (or garlic salt), olive oil and vinegar.

Add back in about 1/4 cup of the tomato sauce from the can of whole tomatoes.

Sprinkle with about 1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano. Mix in and taste. Adjust if needed. Add cilantro, and salt and pepper to taste.

Refrigerate when not using. Will keep several days.

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Recipe for Homemade Tomato Salsa

This recipe for homemade tomato salsa is one that is especially good to make in the summer when the tomatoes are ripe, plentiful and sweet.

This salsa recipe calls for processing for long term storage.

It is a great recipe to make up if you want to have access to your homemade tomato salsa any time of year.

It stores for a long time when canned and can be enjoyed all year long.

However, if you intend to eat it within a few days, there is no need to process it in the boiling water bath.


Green Tomato Relish / Salsa

A tangy salsa type relish that is great on chips, hotdogs, and tacos. The possibilities are endless!

Ingredients

  • 4-½ pounds Green Tomatoes
  • 1 pound Red Bell Pepper
  • ½ pounds Green Bell Pepper
  • 2 whole Jalapenos Stemed Not Seeded
  • 2 whole Cloves Garlic
  • 2 whole White Onions
  • 3 Tablespoons Canning Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon Mustard Seed
  • 1 teaspoon Turmeric
  • ½ teaspoons Celery Seed
  • 1-½ Tablespoon Dry Minced Garlic
  • 1-½ Tablespoon Dry Onion
  • 2 Tablespoons Comino
  • 1 teaspoon Paprika
  • 1 teaspoon Chili Powder
  • 3 Tablespoons Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon White Pepper
  • 2-½ cups White Vinegar
  • ¼ cups Apple Cider Vinegar

Preparation

Pulse all vegetables and peppers in a food processor until a fine mince is achieved.

Add to LARGE pot. Add all other ingredients to the vegetable mixture. Stir well.

Bring mixture to a simmer over medium heat. Simmer 40 minutes stirring frequently.

Take off heat and ladle into pint jars. Process for 20 minutes in a boiling water canner. Allow to cool completely away from drafts. Check seal, then store in a cool dark place. Makes 5.5 pints.


  1. Either chop or process tomatoes in a food processor, to desired consistency. I like a chunkier salsa, so I chopped.
  2. Place tomatoes in large saucepan.
  3. Dice onions, get a few bell peppers, hot peppers and garlic together.
  4. Fine dice the peppers and the garlic.
  5. Add onions, peppers and garlic to the tomatoes in pan.
  6. Add fresh oregano, and parsley or cilantro. Add dried cumin, salt and black pepper. Combine.

Bring pot to boil, reduce heat and simmer until cooked down to desired consistency, 30 minutes to 1 hour.

I hope this helps all of those folks that don&rsquot have a use for all of the green tomatoes that are left at the end of the growing season!

Stay tuned next year, I have a bunch more ideas for your green tomatoes, but I have none left to use!

Want your own crop of green tomatoes? If you love growing your own produce, these posts are packed full of information about how to get that big harvest by the end of the season! Don&rsquot miss our How to Start a Garden Series!

The last is Harvesting a Garden and Preserving the Harvest, this article has over 100 FREE recipes for preserving your harvest!

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Enjoy! And have fun cooking!

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Fire-Roasted Hatch Chile Salsa Recipe

All year-round Texas produces fruits and vegetable ripe for baking, cooking, and canning. Tomato season is just around the corner, and after picking up a few bushels at a farmers’ market or stand, you’ll want to have this salsa recipe handy. Roasting the peppers and tomatoes first adds some toothsome char and also makes them easier to peel. Hatch chiles mingled with jalapeños to bring some smoky depth to the heat just make sure to either wear gloves while working with hot peppers or plan to wash your hands thoroughly afterwards. Canning the results ensures that your salsa is delicious and fresh-tasting for the next year.

Yields six 12-ounce jars

  • 6 pounds Roma tomatoes
  • 4 Hatch chile peppers
  • 2 red jalapeños
  • 2 green jalapeños
  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 1-2 teaspoons sugar (to taste)

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Wash jars, bands, and lids in hot soapy water let drain. Place bands and lids in a saucepan and cover with water. Fill a water-bath canner * and set on the stove over low heat.

Cut tomatoes in half, cut out stem-end cores, and place on baking sheet under broiler for 2 to 4 minutes until skins are slightly charred and slip off easily. While tomatoes cool, roast the 8 peppers over an open flame until blistered, then place in a metal bowl and cover with plastic wrap.

Discard skins and chop the tomatoes. Place in 5-quart stockpot, being sure to include all the juices. You should have about 8 cups of chopped tomatoes and juices from 6 pounds of tomatoes. Rinse the peppers under cool water, discarding ribs, stems, and seeds. The blackened skins should come right off.

Finely chop the peeled and seeded peppers, and add to the stockpot. You should have 1 to 1 1/2 cups of roasted peppers.

Turn the heat under the canner to high and bring to boil. Place the saucepan with lids and bands over low heat do not let boil.

Add the remaining ingredients to the tomato/pepper mixture, adding just 1 teaspoon of sugar to start. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 10 minutes.

While the salsa simmers, sterilize your 12-ounce jars on their sides or upside-down in canner for at least 10 minutes.

Using an immersion blender, carefully purée the salsa to a smoother consistency. Taste for seasonings, and if too vinegary, add another teaspoon or so of sugar. If too sweet, add a bit more vinegar to balance.

Bring blended salsa back to a boil and simmer a few more minutes.

Carefully remove jars with tongs. Use a canning funnel and ladle hot salsa into jars, leaving a 1/2-inch head space. Wipe rims clean with a damp cloth and carefully place lid on and screw bands in place to finger-tightness. Process in a boiling-water bath for 15 minutes, then turn off the burner under the canner, remove the lid, and let sit for 5 minutes.

Remove jars with tongs, being careful to keep them upright. Let cool undisturbed on counter for 24 hours. You will hear popping sounds as the jars seal. If after 24 hours, any of your jars haven’t sealed, put in refrigerator to use now. Store sealed jars of salsa in a cool, dark place, and use within a year.

*If you’re just getting started with water-bath canning, there’s no need to buy a dedicated canner if you have a large enough stockpot with a closely fitting lid just make sure you can fill the pot to a level of at least an inch above your jars without it boiling over. To protect your jars, simply lay a metal cooling rack or couple of folded dishtowels in the bottom of the pot before you fill it, so the jars will sit on the rack or towel and not be in direct contact with the pot (If the jars rest directly on the bottom of the pot, they could shatter). If you decide to buy a canner, you’ll find reasonably prices ones at stores such as Walmart, Target, Tractor Supply, and Ace Hardware—as well as online.


Recipe Summary

  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 3 pounds beef chuck roast, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 (28 ounce) can roma tomatoes, with juice
  • 2 (4 ounce) cans chopped green chile peppers, drained
  • 1 (12 fluid ounce) can or bottle beer
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano, crushed
  • 1 ½ teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • salt to taste
  • ground black pepper to taste

In a Dutch oven, heat oil over medium heat until hot, but not smoking. Pat the meat dry with paper towels and brown in batches, transferring the meat with a slotted spoon to a bowl as they are done.

In the fat remaining in the pot, cook the onions until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 more minute.

Return meat to the pot with any juices in the bowl and add the tomatoes with juice, chiles, beer, beef broth, oregano, cumin, and Worcestershire sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Simmer, partially covered, for 2 1/2 hours or until meat is tender.


Why make this salsa?

  • Quick and easy: this recipe comes together in 5 minutes and can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
  • Fresh or Canned Ingredients: use what you have on hand, grab all of those fresh summer tomatoes, or if needed you can use your canned tomatoes. This allows you to make great quality salsa all year long. Personally I love the texture that comes from using canned tomatoes, but some people prefer all fresh, you can also do a combination of the two.
  • Control the heat: you are in control of the spiciness of this recipe. If you would prefer you can leave the membranes in the jalapeno, you could add more jalapeno, or you could even toss in a Serrano for a little extra heat.
  • Sweetness: using a little touch of honey in this recipe cuts through the acidity of the tomatoes and gives you a nice smooth taste.

Going To The Green Chile Farm

My kids have never been particularly excited about green chile. As kids, my sister and brother and I ate it all the time. We loved to eat it. Even if it was hot, we still ate it. My kids are more like, “Umm, I’ll pass, thanks.” So Chip and I have never had a peeling party tradition like I did growing up.

My daughter recently spent the day with her friend, and her parents took them to Big Jim Farms. Our family had never heard of this place before, so we decided to check it out.

Big Jim Farms is a local farm that grows and sells several types of produce: apples, corn, watermelon, tomatoes, and a few others. They also sell ready-made salsa and there’s a fresh lemonade stand on-site. But the best part of this farm is that you can literally pick your own green chile straight from the plant itself.

We arrived, and at the front of a large field is a small stand. A nice lady at the register gave us the option between a small barrel and a larger barrel to hold our green chile, which is sold by bushel size. And then we were given the option to have the chile roasted for an extra $5. Which, I have no quarrels with having someone else roast our green chile, despite the wonderful memory I have of my dad doing it by hand. All. Day. Long. So we paid the five bucks.

Out To The Field

The rows were separated by the level of heat, with mild chile growing on one end, extra hot on the other end, and everything else in between. Of course, we went for the hot and extra hot. There’s really no other option!

We picked our green chile, each of us competing with one another, trying to find the one chile that was the largest in size.

I had my eye on the ones that were starting to turn red. Those are my favorite. They have a slightly sweeter and smokier flavor, and I love the taste of those mixed with the green.

We filled up our barrel, and walked over to the line to get them roasted.

Roasting

While we were waiting in line, we bought a few lemonades and sipped on those. There was one gentleman operating three roasters, but the wait was not long. Did I mention the to-die-for aroma of roasted green chile? It would have been alright with us if the line was a little longer. Just for extra time to breathe in the delicious scent.

We hauled our freshly roasted green chile to the car and drove home. Ultimately it was a wonderful experience and a great way to spend some quality family time together! I’m certain we will be back next year. Perhaps this new discovery will become a yearly tradition for our own family!


Going To The Green Chile Farm

My kids have never been particularly excited about green chile. As kids, my sister and brother and I ate it all the time. We loved to eat it. Even if it was hot, we still ate it. My kids are more like, “Umm, I’ll pass, thanks.” So Chip and I have never had a peeling party tradition like I did growing up.

My daughter recently spent the day with her friend, and her parents took them to Big Jim Farms. Our family had never heard of this place before, so we decided to check it out.

Big Jim Farms is a local farm that grows and sells several types of produce: apples, corn, watermelon, tomatoes, and a few others. They also sell ready-made salsa and there’s a fresh lemonade stand on-site. But the best part of this farm is that you can literally pick your own green chile straight from the plant itself.

We arrived, and at the front of a large field is a small stand. A nice lady at the register gave us the option between a small barrel and a larger barrel to hold our green chile, which is sold by bushel size. And then we were given the option to have the chile roasted for an extra $5. Which, I have no quarrels with having someone else roast our green chile, despite the wonderful memory I have of my dad doing it by hand. All. Day. Long. So we paid the five bucks.

Out To The Field

The rows were separated by the level of heat, with mild chile growing on one end, extra hot on the other end, and everything else in between. Of course, we went for the hot and extra hot. There’s really no other option!

We picked our green chile, each of us competing with one another, trying to find the one chile that was the largest in size.

I had my eye on the ones that were starting to turn red. Those are my favorite. They have a slightly sweeter and smokier flavor, and I love the taste of those mixed with the green.

We filled up our barrel, and walked over to the line to get them roasted.

Roasting

While we were waiting in line, we bought a few lemonades and sipped on those. There was one gentleman operating three roasters, but the wait was not long. Did I mention the to-die-for aroma of roasted green chile? It would have been alright with us if the line was a little longer. Just for extra time to breathe in the delicious scent.

We hauled our freshly roasted green chile to the car and drove home. Ultimately it was a wonderful experience and a great way to spend some quality family time together! I’m certain we will be back next year. Perhaps this new discovery will become a yearly tradition for our own family!


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Fire Roasted Hatch Green Chile Salsa

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 6 large Hatch green chile previously fire roasted
  • 1 pound tomatillos
  • Big handful of fresh cilantro
  • 1 large clove of garlic
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • 1/3 tsp Mexican oregano
  • 3/4 cup water
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

Directions

Notes

Tried this recipe? Mention @pinaenlacocina or tag #pinaenlacocina!

Here is the hatch green chile salsa garnishing our refried bean and bacon tostadas! Great brunch!!

last year I ordered a whole case of hot hatch green chile! Even after splitting the case with a friend, I found that it was just too much green chile for me. The thing was that the hot variety was so spicy, that I could not share it with friends, lol! I love my friends, so I could not ambush them with this extra spicy batch. I was told this year, when purchasing my green chiles, that the growers insisted that the crops were extra spicy due to the extra heat they had experienced in New Mexico that year.

So this year, I did not order a case. Instead I went to the market on the first day of the event and purchased a smaller amount of medium heat green chile and roasted it as soon as I got home.

A great trick I learned last year, remove stems and seeds before roasting!! Blend with skins on in a high powered blender! No fuss peeling skins off and removing seeds.

Poach tomatillos in simmering water just until they change from bright green to an opaque olive color. No need to boil them until they burst open. The myth is that this makes your salsa bitter if the tomatillos tear open.

I added my fresh cilantro to the blender. It will yield a bright green salsa! But, I like to cook my salsa in a sauce pan for about 15 minutes after blending. It cooks out any remaining raw flavors. And it also keeps the tomatillos from clumping, or congealing in the refrigerator.

If you love that bright green finish the cilantro gives the salsa, wait until after you blend and cook the salsa. Once it cools blend in the cilantro!

Below, is a quick corn tortilla quesadilla that I prepared as soon as the hatch green chile was done roasting!! I used queso Oaxaca and organic corn tortillas.