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Flight Through The Aviary Slideshow

Flight Through The Aviary Slideshow

Arthur Bovino

A quick amuse to taste when you sit down, the edible Bloody Mary is tart, delicate, and meticulously garnished.

Edible Bloody Mary

Arthur Bovino

A quick amuse to taste when you sit down, the edible Bloody Mary is tart, delicate, and meticulously garnished.

Champagne Cocktail

Arthur Bovino

This Champagne cocktail features a homemade raspberry purée at the bottom of the flute — a sweet finish.

Cantaloupe — Prosciutto, Basil, Champagne

Arthur Bovino

First item on the list of "Bites" on the menu at The Aviary is the Cantaloupe, a rectangular take on something you've most frequently seen melon-balled or cubed, no doubt. Firm melon, with salty moments that last after the bite disappears. Simple enough, but better than anything tasted during a full tasting menu at Moto down the street.

Pineapple — Mint, Sanbitter, Chartreuse

Arthur Bovino

This cocktail was sweet and tart. Through the haze of a seven-course tasting, smooth, small, crunchy pebbles are recalled as its most intriguing facet.

Pork Belly — Coconut, Curry, Iceberg

Arthur Bovino

A concave lettuce arrowhead filled with a super soft bite of pork belly that dissolves immediately. It's delicious but not heavily seasoned, nor overly manipulated.

Ginger — Peychaud's, Shiso, Lime, Vodka

Arthur Bovino

A light, quasi-powdery 'ice' that's more like snow, the lightest snow you can imagine. And are those tracing paper thin slices of hot pepper? You're instructed to mix in the vodka yourself and then use the lemongrass swizzle stick to mix it. The texture approximately puts this cocktail in a genre of ice slushie that also includes the Commonwealth Narwhal in San Francisco, and the amazing liquid nitrogen caipirinha at The Bazaar in L.A.

But the Ginger is in a class of its own. It's the best cocktail I've ever had. Besides its flavor and texture there are fingerling lime vesicles that burst in your mouth while you're drinking and then even after you've finished the drink. During a seven-flight cocktail tasting this effect of flavor lingering seemed to occur several times — amazing.

Rhubarb — Lemon Balm, Cocchi, Tonic, Gin

Arthur Bovino

Sweet and tart, whispers of a Pisco Sour.

Potato — Custard, Malt Vinegar Chips, Chive

Arthur Bovino

It may be listed on the menu as potato (custard, malt vinegar chips, chive), but it tastes like the most amazing tater tot in the world. Imagine the lightest, smoothest, savory potato custard rolled in something akin to tater tot Rice Krispies.

Root Beer — Vanilla, Sassafras, Kirsch

Arthur Bovino

Picture what you think an old-school root beer used to taste like. Imagine soda the way you think it was made when it wasn't all about corn syrup, when nuanced flavor was part of the equation, and you get an approximation of what not-too-sweet soda cocktail tastes like.

Cheesecake — Strawberry, Balsamic, Graham Cracker

Arthur Bovino

Airy foam with a soft exterior. Not too sweet, not creamy, and with a burst of strawberry flavor that lingers after the bite is finished.

White Russian — Ristretto, Milk, Rum

Arthur Bovino

This homage to the Dude's cocktail of choice impressed with a milk ice cube that flaked off pleasantly when bitten.

Brioche — Chocolate, Smoked Salt, Vanilla

Arthur Bovino

The sweet-but-not-overly-sweet nature of this light chocolate bite makes it a success even for those who usually skip dessert.

Lobster, Crab, Chowder

Arthur Bovino

Lobster (front and center) was perhaps the least exciting or flavorful bite on the menu: cracker, Comté, grape. A little bite of sweet lobster wasn't bad, just not in the same realm as the others.

Crab, "A play on Crab Louie," the waitress noted, consisted of tempura, tomato, and pickle. The last being inside, an enjoyably vinegar burst to finish the bite.

The Chowder croquette with clam and spicy corn pudding joined Crab and Potato as another next-level fried treat.

A Scene At The Aviary

Arthur Bovino

To the left and ahead, the door to Next. Far in the front, The Aviary kitchen. Banquettes against the wall. Syncopated gushing by patrons burst like popcorn around the room as some of the more complex drinks are placed in front of them.

Blueberry — Verjus, Sweet Vermouth, Rye

Arthur Bovino

A glass canteen filled with beautiful, multicolored herbs, fruits, and flowers. The flavor and color of the drink changes over time as it sits.

Wagyu, Crab, Foie Gras

Arthur Bovino

A quick bite of soft, flavorful Wagyu seasoned with smoked paprika, pumpkin seed, and yogurt. A second bite of crab (just because), and the Foie Gras: rhubarb, pumpernickel, and lavender. So smooth.

Lilac

Arthur Bovino

Margarita

Arthur Bovino

Sazerac — Demerarra, Peychaud's, Rye

Arthur Bovino

If you're a cocktail geek you've no doubt seen or heard about this one. The ice sphere contains the drink. It's cracked open and the cocktail spills out. When you experience something like this, the adjective 'cool,' as simple and overused as it might be, seems to have found its higher calling.

Sazerac — Realized

Arthur Bovino

Complimentary Cocktail

Arthur Bovino


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


20 Tips From Air-Travel Insiders

Know the difference between &ldquodirect&rdquo and &ldquononstop&rdquo flights, and always opt for the latter. Unlike nonstops, direct flights can touch down at other airports on the way to their ultimate destinations, says Macon Dunnagan, a baggage handler with US Airways. And while stops are built in to the total travel time, the potential delays they can cause aren&rsquot.

Make sure you buy your ticket under the exact name that appears on your ID. It might seem obvious to you that Betsy is a nickname for Elizabeth, but it may not to a skycap, a desk agent, or a security officer―any of whom could ask you to show ID with that name before boarding, says Delta Air Lines public-relations rep Katie Connell.

Select your seats ASAP. &ldquoIf you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,&rdquo says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline&rsquos policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they&rsquore made available to everyone through the airline&rsquos website.

Get to your gateway city as early as you can. &ldquoSince delays stack up as the day progresses, it&rsquos smart to book the first flight you can into a hub [if you have a connecting flight],&rdquo says Dunnagan.

Double-check foreign document requirements. Some countries―like Chile, Kenya, and India―require a visa for entry others, like South Africa, won&rsquot allow entrance unless a traveler&rsquos passport contains at least two blank, unstamped pages. You need to be aware of such requirements before you make your flight reservations or you could get stuck Stateside, according to a source at the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs. For a complete list of entrance regulations, visit travel.state.gov/.


Watch the video: When Jesus Tomb Was Opened For The First Time, Scientists Made A Groundbreaking Discovery (October 2021).